UK investigation launched into risk of HIV and hep B from microdermabrasion

By Lucy Tandon Copp 11-Jan-2017

Public Health England has launched an investigation into a series of needlestick injuries linked to the popular microdermabrasion treatment

The risk of transmission of blood-borne viruses such as HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C from needle microdermabrasion is being investigated by Public Health England (PHE).

The investigation was prompted after a series of injuries were reported between March and May last year in beauty salons in the North West.

Three salon therapists experienced needlestick injuries while performing needle microdermabrasion – a popular skin exfoliation treatment that requires the use of a handheld needling device to prick the skin.

It’s essential to have a needlestick injuries policy in place in your business – this is to safeguard yourself and also that of your patients and customers.

When the skin is pricked it can result in bleeding putting the therapist and customer at risk of viruses and infections spread through blood and bodily fluids.

The three salon therapists were all injured using the same microdermabrasion needling device and later tested negative for blood borne viruses.

Minimising risk

Antonia Mariconda, Safety in Beauty Campaign Founder, told Cosmetics Business: “Professionals must ensure they have attended certified training before undertaking these treatments. It’s essential to have a needlestick injuries policy in place in your business – this is to safeguard . . .

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