Coronavirus: Britain's beauty salons are now allowed to reopen

From 13 July, nail bars, spas and beauticians will be able to welcome back customers, but not all treatments will be on the menu

After an agonising wait, beauty salons in the UK have finally been given the go-ahead to welcome back customers.

The announcement, made yesterday by the government’s Secretary of State for Culture Media and Sport, Oliver Dowden, will allow most beauty services to carry out treatments once again.

Speaking at the coronavirus daily briefing, Dowden said: “Having allowed hairdressers to reopen, beauticians, tattooists, spas, tanning salons and other close contact services can now do the same.”

However, the professional beauty industry will not be able to return completely back to normal as, according to the new government guidelines, only services that are not carried out directly in front of the face will be available to consumers.

This will restrict face waxing, eyelash treatments, make-up application and facial treatments, until further guidance is given.

The Conservative Party have also said that where two metre social distancing cannot be maintained, those providing the service should wear further protective equipment, such as a visor, screen or other barrier.

Millie Kendall, CEO of The British Beauty Council said the decision was a “positive step”.

“The decision to broaden the scope of available hair and beauty services will allow many more beauty professionals to get back to work, and will also allow customers to benefit from a range of beauty treatments, which can be carried out safely for both client and practitioner.”

She added: “It’s a positive step, but we are still only part of the way there.

“We will keep working closely with governing bodies and supporting everyone in beauty until we are able to achieve the fully-reinvigorated beauty industry we all want.”

In recent weeks, the government was met with growing pressure from industry bodies and professionals to reopen more of the beauty sectors, after hairdressers were given the green light last month.

The All Party Parliamentary Group on Beauty, Aesthetics & Wellbeing wrote an open letter to Prime Minister (PM) Boris Johnson earlier this month calling for the government to recognise the industry as a “serious economic player” and give guidance to reopen.

In a statement to Cosmetics Business, Carolyn Harris and Judith Cummins, the group's co-Chairs, welcomed the decision.

“We are delighted that beauty, spa and wellbeing services are finally allowed to reopen.

“Whilst it is shameful that the government has taken so long to make this critical announcement, it finally will allow our £30bn beauty industry to begin to rebuild itself and mean that many people around the country can again have beauty treatments that are essential to their mental health and wellbeing.

“The All-Party Parliamentary Group will continue to fight for the beauty industry in parliament and well beyond it.”

Meanwhile, the General Manager of beauty brand Dermalogica, Mark Hermann, said in a statement to the PM at the end of June that the industry’s collapse would be “devastating”.


'Breathe a sigh of relief'

Analysis:
By Becky Bargh
Online & Social Media Reporter


Salon owners can breathe a sigh of relief that their industry has finally been given the go-ahead to reopen their doors.

It truly has been an agonising wait for so many small and independent businesses, that have watched fellow industries welcome back customers, while being forced to wait for the green light.

While not all services will be able to return to normal, this is a huge win for the sector and will allow the industry to kick-start its £28.4bn contribution to the UK economy.

But this is just the beginning. Now that businesses have been granted permission to reopen, they need to ensure their establishments are Covid-19 safe for consumers to visit and staff to work in, including proper sanitisation, protective equipment and guidance.

And new innovative ways to engage with customers will have to be explored.

Beauty brand Dermalogica has published a range of recommendations for skin therapists in order for them to practice human touch services post-pandemic.

For more on its Clean Touch initiative:

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