The Body Shop unveils koala protection plan

Queensland is one of the world’s most affected regions of deforestation with 1,000 rugby pitches of forest destroyed every day

Image of Arslanbob, a village in Kyrgyzstan

The Body Shop has it’s sights set on protecting koalas in Australia’s Queensland forests.

According to The Economist, every day 1,000 rugby pitches of forest are destroyed in Queensland’s forest, contributing to the demise of one of the country’s iconic animal symbols.

Through its World Bio-Bridges Mission, The Body Shop has partnered with ngos Koala Crusaders and The Noosa Biosphere Community to restore 750 hectares of forest in Noosa, Queensland.

Simon Locke, International Environmental Sustainability Manager at The Body Shop, said: “Through our Re-Wilding programme our aim is to make a substantial difference to some of the planet’s richest and most diverse areas.

“With the support of local charity partners, we’re dedicated to raising awareness of the extreme loss of biodiversity our world and forests are facing and to provide a truly long-lasting impact to the habitats and species which need it most.”

Additionally, The Body Shop will be working on a new project in Kyrgyzstan with conservation charity Fauna and Flora International to support 400 hectares of forest restoration.

The organisations also hope to educate local communities on sustainable living and farming methods.

As part of the brand’s Re-Wild the World initiative, £1 from every new Hemp and British Rose Hand Cream sold will be donated towards the programme.

Locke added: “Through engaging our equally passionate customers, we are determined to fight deforestation and re-wild the world.”

Since the project launched in 2016, The Body Shop has been involved in campaigns across Vietnam, India, Indonesia and Malaysia, and is said to have protected 41 million sqm of forest.

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