California introduces new bill to end animal testing for cosmetics

The US state has introduced a new cruelty-free bill that could see an animal testing ban come into effect in January 2020

Image: Daniil Vnoutchkov

California is the latest US state to introduce a new bill that could ban the sale of cosmetics tested on animals.

Senator Cathleen Galgiani introduced The California Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act, SB 1249, after Hawaii announced that two bills had been introduced to end the controversial testing method earlier this month.

SB 1249 would make it illegal for any cosmetics manufacturer to knowingly import or sell any product – including personal hygiene items such as deodorant, shampoo or conditioner. The new legislation would mean that if the final product or any component of the product was tested on animals after 1 January 2020 it would be in breach. A violation would result in a fine of up to US$500 for the first misdemeanour and up to $1,000 for each subsequent offence.

A violation would result in a fine of up to US$500 for the first misdemeanour and up to $1,000 for each subsequent offence.

The new Golden State bill is sponsored by Social Compassion in Legislation and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, and supported by Cruelty Free International and Lush Cosmetics.

“California has long been a leader in promoting modern alternatives to animal tests,” said Senator Galgiani.

“Inaction at the federal level compels California to lead the way in ensuring a cruelty-free cosmetics market for its citizens by barring any new ingredients or cosmetics that are tested on animals.”

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