Black consumers are boosting the hair care market

Shampoo sales among black consumers are forecast to reach $473m in 2017, the largest growth in the category in five years

Black consumers are providing a welcome boost to the hair care market in the US, new Mintel figures have revealed.

According to research, shampoo sales among black consumers are predicted to grow 7.3% to reach around $473m in 2017.

The growth is the largest to be seen in the category in the last five years.

Toya Mitchell, multicultural analyst at Mintel, said: “Shampoo is no longer a basic product used merely for cleansing, but rather the foundation for establishing healthy hair, all the way through styling.

“We predict shampoo sales to increase, signalling that the creation of regimen product lines, particularly those with formulations for specific hair care issues and goals, will continue to resonate among black consumers.”

Hair maintenance routines

Half of the consumers surveyed were found to wash their hair once a week or a few times a month on set-aside wash days.

On average, just over one hour or 63.1 minutes are spent on basic hair maintenance on these days, compared with 21.2 minutes on a normal day.

More than half at 52% said they use three to four hair care products as part of their regime.

Natural hair gains popularity

While the trend for straightened or relaxed looks is still popular among some, more consumers are choosing to wear their hair natural.

As a result, relaxer product sales are falling, down 36.6% from 2012-2017 to reach $525m. Tellingly, 79% of consumers have worn a natural hairstyle in the past year, compared to 28% who have worn a relaxed hairstyle and 36% who straighten their hair.

“Wearing relaxer-free, natural hair is the norm for most black consumers,” Mitchell added, “especially among young, trendy consumers who are adopting a variety of styles appropriate for work and play.

“Interest in chemical-free hair, a desire for healthy hair and new methods of achieving straight hairstyles are rendering relaxers unnecessary for many.”

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