Tubes up the ante for aesthetics and protection

In competitive categories, among mid-market or high-end products, today’s tubes have everything it takes to get themselves noticed. Paul Gander reports

European production volumes of tubes destined for all product categories have been stable for several years, according to the European Tube Manufacturers’ Association (etma), edging up just one percentage point between 2015 and 2016.

According to the association, 46% of its members’ tube production went to what it calls the ‘cosmetics sector’ in 2016, with toothpaste additionally accounting for just over 20%, pharmaceuticals just under 20%, and sectors such as food and DIY taking smaller slices.

“The share of cosmetics in the total tubes market has been stable over the last five years at between 43% and 45%, and has not grown faster than other market segments,” says etma Secretary General Gregor Spengler, adding that the proportion supplied for toothpaste has been similarly stable over the same period.

But while the cosmetics, personal care and oral care sectors will want to keep an eye on volumes, their principal concern has to be value: clearly, in terms of the cost of their packaging, but also in the important sense of its perceived value.

When it comes to perceptions, there are a number of audiences to satisfy, often in different ways. For example, in terms of the types of . . .

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