Superdrug marks milestones in first sustainability report

The British health and beauty high street chain has reduced its carbon footprint by 82%

Superdrug's 'Doing Good Feels Super' campaign

British beauty and health retailer Superdrug has released its first corporate social responsibility (CSR) report as part of its new sustainability campaign.

The high street chain's latest push, Doing Good Feels Super, is said to be the company's largest CSR campaign and will run across internal and external communication channels, including, in-store, digital, PR and social.

Nigel Duxbury, Head of Superdrug's CSR committee, described the report as a "landmark moment" for the 57-year-old company: "We have set some strong targets for the next five years and are also close to finalising ten year targets above and beyond our 2025 commitments.

"Superdrug’s mission is to be the best in everyday accessible beauty and health, but always with guiding principles and strong values at our heart. And so we remain dedicated to our CSR agenda and place continued focus and pace on all of our activities to evolve and improve what we do.”

The 62-page document highlights key achievements Superdrug has made and outlines further ambitions across its four CSR pillars: 'planet', 'community', 'customer' and 'people'.

Highlights from the report include how the company signed the New Plastics Economy Global Commitment in 2020; reduced its carbon footprint by 82% since 2010; reduced overall energy consumption by 43%; and saved 370 tonnes of virgin card in 2019 by switching to 100% recycled cardboard for its e-commerce orders.

This year, Superdrug is launching 100% recycled plastic bottles across its private label hair care lines, fully recyclable own-brand Pro Care toothpaste tubes and all wipes will be biodegradable.

By 2025, Superdrug will use 100% sustainable palm oil in its private label products; 100% of its plastic packaging will be reusable, recyclable or compostable; and 100% of its paper/pulp packaging will be certified as sustainable.

The company also said that it will move away from single use towards reuse models by promoting reusable containers with refillable and return schemes, as well as develop larger packs for 'everyday favourites' to reduce packaging.

"We all have a responsibility to do what we can, from supporting our local communities, learning from our employee networks, to being mindful of how we’re treating the planet," said Peter Macnab, CEO of Superdrug, in the report. "These won’t be our only goals, but they are a great place to start."

Companies