Venus makes pubic announcement to change stigma around women's intimate area

Beauty brand wants to change rhetoric around women’s pubic region with new Vulva Appreciation Day

‘Pubic’ is a word that more than half of UK women admit feeling uncomfortable saying in public, and consequently use other phrases to refer to their intimate areas, according to findings by Gillette’s shaving brand for women Venus.

For this reason, Venus is empowering females to take back the language for their intimate areas by encouraging women to speak freely about grooming and the pubic region.

Around 47% of women also said they have been made to feel uncomfortable using terms such as ‘vagina’ or ‘pubic’ in public.

Meanwhile, two thirds (66%) of respondents wish there were more accurate descriptions and imagery of women grooming their pubes in society.

To combat this embarrassment, the brand has dubbed 12 May (today) as Vulva Appreciation Day, a campaign led by Venus’ body positivity ambassadors Alex Light, Scarlett Curtis, Natalie Lee and Ewoma Ukeleghe.

Venus is also launching a series of educational content, as well as a podcast, in collaboration with The Happy Vagina, a podcast that celebrates women, hosted by British actress Mika Simmons.

To mark the celebratory Day, Venus has also introduced its new Venus For Pubic Hair & Skin Collection, comprising an exfoliant, shave gel, razor and serum that can be used together to avoid ingrown hairs, shave bumps and redness when shaving the pubic region.

“We should feel free to talk about our pubic areas,” said Olivia Hughes, Senior Communications Manager for Venus.

“While many women don’t regularly talk about their pubic hair and skin, 98% of UK women choose to remove at least some of their pubic hair in some way.

“If we were more open and less ashamed to talk all things pubic, we’d probably know that many of us are experiencing the same issues when it comes to pubic shaving and skin care.”

She added: “Our new collection not only offers women more options for pubic grooming than we ever have before, but starts a new conversation about using language that accurately and respectfully represents the female body.”

Companies